I’m sharing my personal migraine story in partnership with Promius Pharma as a paid spokesperson. The story, thoughts, and opinions below are expressly my own. Promius Pharma is not responsible for any other content on this site.

What does a migraine look like? Better yet, what does a migraine sufferer look like? This weekend, I was reminded that we come in all shapes and sizes when I attended the Miles for Migraine walk in Philadelphia. I participated as a spokesperson for No Time 4 Migraines, with an aim of raising awareness and funds for this often debilitating disease. Being surrounded by fellow patients, caregivers, and supporters who collectively wanted to do something about it was an incredible experience. And guess who came with me? My mom! The one woman who has always been there by my side and who happens to be a migraine patient as well.

Hundreds of people showed up. Some wore capes, others wore hair caps that looked like brains (which were hilarious BTW) and there were even a few dozen who created t-shirts with funny migraine-related slogans. Migraine humor? Who knew!?

I think the most moving sight for me was watching young children run the race as sufferers while their parents supported them. I didn’t get my first migraine until I was in college, and here were 10-year-olds who already had to deal with the attacks. I wanted to hug them all to let them know that I understood. But instead, I stood off to the side thinking about the fate of my three kids. It’s scary to think that a disease that often leaves patients at its mercy could affect your family. Sometimes we feel helpless. Other times, we take part in events like Miles for Migraine and act! It felt great to support efforts to fight back against migraines!

 

And can I just show you the booth? I had no idea that my face was going to be all over it. LOL! Totally unexpected. 🙂 I almost took that fabric poster home with me.

Coming together for a cause that directly affects me is not something I can say I’ve done before in the past. I’ve always been the one that’s done the supporting. However, over the weekend, I was being supported. Boy, what a great feeling that was! It was so empowering. I no longer felt alone. I was no longer ashamed or to blame. The entire group casually spoke about migraines and how they personally affect our families. It was a breath of fresh air to know that I’m not the only one dealing with these migraine monsters!

I guess you could say that ‘Miles for Migraine’ was an eye-opener for me. You don’t have to sit back and just accept what is happening to you in your life. There are actionable and measurable steps you can take to make a difference.

At the event, I had the chance to interview several neurologists about why they decided to take part in the big day. We also chatted about the challenges of migraine and common questions asked by patients like you on No Time 4 Migraines social channels. By the way, be sure to follow the No Time 4 Migraines on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube for when those videos are shared in the coming weeks! Also, check out my Facebook live videos from the event where I explain more about the event and my personal experience.

Migraine attacks are awful, but after my Miles for Migraine experience, I know that there is a community that is actively engaged in taking a stand against this disease. I’m so proud to be a spokesperson for No Time 4 Migraines and their continued work in educating and fostering a digital community of like-minded individuals. Together we can make a difference.

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